Apr 5, 2007

Rapid Rhetoric: MARGARITACEOUS

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Raphael's depiction of Plato defining the difference between true and false rhetoric This is an irregular feature - both in frequency and oddness - dedicated to a word I came across that I have never previously used.

margaritaceous mar-guhr-ih-TAY-shuhs adj. Related to, or resembling pearls; pearl-like; having the satiny, opaque iridescence like that of pearls.

The word is derived from the Latin margarita and from the Greek margarites , both of which translate directly as "pearl." The alcoholic beverage called the margarita was likely named after a woman; Wikipedia has several possible origins of the drink name.

6 comments:

Hooda Thunkit said...

I've seen this very word (in one form or another) somewhere before...;-)

As in (casting)pearls before swine, if I recall correctly.

microdot said...

Interesting, the little daisy like flowers that grow in the grass and seem to be like pearls strewn across the land scape are called in French, Margaurites.

Maggie Thurber said...

And I was always told that the meaning of my name, Margaret, was 'pearl' ...

microdot said...

okay, now, how does pizza margharita fit into this? That's the Italian name for a plain cheese pizza (with tomato sauuce, of course)

Maggie Thurber said...

On a side note - congrats on your nomination HM!!!

Hooda Thunkit said...

As I heard it, nominations.

Congrats Mike!

;-)