Jun 20, 2007

Precision Marketing, or Annoying Debris?

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(Toledo, OH) The light blue plastic bags get tossed by a person in a car over the weekend, and these packets of advertising flyers clutter the streets of my neighborhood.

The Toledo Blade calls this service Precision Marketing, and it is designed to put ad material in the hands of consumers who do not receive the Blade on Sunday.

Unfortunately, I would hazard a guess that most of these ads go unread. Moreover, they serve as a bright blue beacon to criminals about the houses that are currently unoccupied, as the owners are not around to retrieve the accumulating bags.

The Toledo Blade in not the only culprit, as other vendors deliver material in plastic bags. However, it is my experience that the people who deliver the Blade's bags in my neighborhood make no effort to do anything more than drop these at the street.

And the "precision marketing" soon becomes a soggy pile of mud-covered rubbish that seems to serve no purpose beyond adding to local litter problems.

11 comments:

SensorG said...

My wife would be happy to get the ads...Since more then a few of the ads have moved over to the Free Press and the Free Press doesn't seem capable of actually getting delivered to my door more then once every 5 weeks or so, we miss out on a lot of the ads.

HumboldtsClio said...

I'm still of the opinion that "direct" marketing (via papering neighborhoods) is heavily outdated.

Stephanie said...

In my area there are "free" papers that are delivered to every house. There's more than one. We've called, we've talked to the delivery people, and still they come. There's a mountain of them on our porch that we clear off every once in a while; but other than that they stay.

I almost feel bad for the would-be intruder who takes it as a welcome mat, though.

Anonymous said...

I consider the tossed papers to be litter. I don't know why it's legal for publishers to delivery them any way but by subscription.

Anonymous said...

Uh, make that "deliver" -- not "delivery."

historymike said...

SensorG:

We have had difficulty getting the Free Press carrier to deliver, but we live on a corner with a house that faces the cross street. When it DOES show up, it's on the porch.

historymike said...

Agreed, Humboldtsclio, that "direct" marketing is often wasteful.

historymike said...

Steph:

I have seen some of those mountains of papers you describe, and I feel bad for the old folks who have to walk out and clean that junk up.

historymike said...

Good question, anonymous, although I suppose it comes down to freedom of expression.

Ban the newspapers, and you'd have to ban the political flyers, religious solicitors, and probably the Girl Scouts, too.

Anonymous said...

I'm all for banning all of those, Mike. Yes, even the Girl Scouts. I do not like seeing kids going to stranges' doors and am amazed that organizations and schools promote it. When I was a sweet young thing selling magazine subscriptions door to door, I was assaulted at one home. Scared the stuffin' out of me.

Mad Jack said...

That's not a bug, it's a feature.

The best part about any of these ads is the nice plastic bag the ad comes in. If I'm out walking the dog and have forgotten to bring my own plastic bag, oftentimes I can find one of these lying around and use it in its primary office: cleaning up after Fido.