Jul 2, 2007

Removing a Tick From a Dog

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(Toledo, OH) After returning from a lengthy walk at Wildwood Metropark, my wife noticed that one of our dogs had a tick embedded in its skin. Given the fact that we use Frontline flea and tick products, this was a first for us; despite all of the tromping around I have done in the woods, I have yet to be bitten by a tick myself.

Thus, in the spirit of shared knowledge, I am presenting for your consideration an effective method of tick removal that served me well in lo, this one opportunity to remove a tick from a dog.

1. Sterilize a pair of tweezers.
2. Get a person to help you hold down the afflicted pooch.
3. Grasp the tick with the tweezers in the fattest part of its ectoparasitical body.
4. Slowly but firmly pull back until it is removed.
5. Encase the tick in a piece of tissue and flush it down the toilet, as ticks have exoskeletons and are surprisingly resistant to being crushed. In addition, crushing the tick with your fingers can spread infectious disease, especially the dreaded Lyme disease.
6. If any pieces of the tick remain in the skin, just pull out any that protrude. Do not try to dig out any remnants of the tick that remain deep in the dog's skin.
7. Use a topical antibiotic spray, such as Bactine, on the affected area.
8. Pet the brave little pooch, and provide a nutritious treat for being so well-behaved during the tick removal process.

I have read that the old method of using a heat source, such as a match head, is not advised for tick removal. The heat can force the tick to burrow deeper, and you also run the risk of accidentally burning your pet.

I believe that the above process would work well with children, cats, and wombats, should you ever need to remove a tick from one of these. You might need an extra person to subdue a wombat, though, as I hear they do not have the most pleasant of dispositions. I am not sure, however, if this procedure would work equally well at removing one's spouse from a dedicated bout of furniture shopping. I suspect that a tick can exert much less force than can a deal-obsessed shopper.

6 comments:

jshriver said...

Nice article, hope I never have to use the advice but if I do at least I'll know how to properly do it. When I was little I was told to remove them using a match, didnt know that was wrong. Interesting.

Sarah said...

I have lots of experience in removing ticks from my dog - especially since we moved to South Carolina (and despite the fact that we use Advantix). A much easier method is to completely cover the tick with Vasoline (or something similar - I use Triple Antibiotic First Aid Ointment). Repeat a couple of times every few hours. This kills (suffocates) the tick and in about a day, you can safely remove the dead tick, with its head attached. I usually use tweezers, but sometimes you can pick them off.

Roo said...

I used to use spent motor oil to get ticks off the horses. Worked very well.

As for the dogs, a cottonball soaked in wintergreen alcohol will cause the tick to let go of the animal when covered with it. Some process about drying them and freezing them at the same time. My dogs never seemed to mind this as I could do it while they sat next to me. No holding them down and causing all kinds of angst.

MP said...

Did not need that picture over my morning cup of joe.

Mad Jack said...

1. Sterilize a pair of tweezers.
Which entails finding the matches you can't find whenever you want to light the candles for a romantic dinner for two.

2. Get a person to help you hold down the afflicted pooch.
Doggie Says: It's time to play! Let's wrestle!

3. Grasp the tick with the tweezers in the fattest part of its ectoparasitical body.
Doggie Says: It's time to play! Let's wrestle!

4. Slowly but firmly pull back until it is removed.
Doggie Says: It's time to play! Let's wrestle!

And so on...

discount furniture said...

The write up on this article is great on removing a tick from your dog. Mine had one over the summer and I really could have used this. I will bookmark this for later.