Nov 8, 2008

Live Fleetwood Mac - "Tusk" - with Special Guests

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As a teenager I did not quite understand the bitter sarcasm and not-so-subtle phallic imagery in the Buckingham-penned song "Tusk," though I thought the song was especially quirky and catchy.

I find "Tusk" to be one of the best uses of a marching band in a pop song, though admittedly this is a small sub-genre of music. While listening today to the live Fleetwood Mac collection The Dance, I was intrigued by the live appearance of the USC Trojan Marching Band, who reprised their 1979 contributions to the original "Tusk." Here is the video of the performance, courtesy of YouTube:



The reaction of the crowd to the unannounced marching band is especially worth studying; can you imagine attending a Fleetwood Mac concert and suddenly being treated with such an aural and visual extravaganza? This is worth at least a NetFlix rental to experience in higher definition the talented Marching Trojans, though perhaps calling New York movers is a bit extreme.


Click and enjoy.

4 comments:

Middle Aged Woman said...

This whole concert is an aural treat. The musical entry of the Trojans is chill-inducing, and a close second is the entry of the bass. This concert also contains my favorite version of Rhiannon, too.

Brian Schwartz said...

I never really got the lyrics to "Tusk". I've never heard the album all the way through, but it is my understanding that it is a concept album. Therefore, I always assumed to get the lyrics, you had to listen to the entire album.

That said, it is one of my favorite Fleetwood Mac songs. I remember when bands like Aerosmith and Pink Floyd used to use brass in their rock and roll. Those days (and rock music's best days) are behind us now.

microdot said...

I hadn't heard Tusk for many years. Thanks, Mike...I remember when it came out and it was a little too much for the easy listening market that had embraced Fleetwood Mac at the time...this was after all, a band with a history....

I tried to think of other bands which used marching bands in their music and aside from seeing Carla Bleys Big Band assault the audience...brilliantly...
I remember Sister Ann by the MC5 on the High Time record...they used a professional Salvation Army Band on that cut...

But, I recall the drumming of Kieth Moon of the Who...maybe in the earlier records it was more aparrent. He was a marching band drummer and a very flamboyant one and the technique carried over into his style. If you watch videos of the Who and the showy stylized drumming of Moon, you realize that you are looking at a kid who was used to wearing a flashy band uniform and impressing a crowd....

Tim Higgins said...

I saw Lindsay Buckingham performing the song a couple of weekends ago on an A&E performance. He is able to kick some butt on this one.